Childhood Fears

December 02, 2017 07:30 PM

Childhood Fears

December 02, 2017 07:30 PM

Fear is one of the most basic and universal emotions human beings experience during their lifetime. With each phase of development, the type of fears and the anxiety triggers will vary among people.

These emotions will start forming from childhood, for example, as your child turns two, he will start experiencing fear of separation from his parents and maybe fear of strangers. Later, as he turns six, he may experience fear of monsters and darkness. The older your child becomes, the type of fears he may experience will be of a more realistic nature, such as fear of falling, fear of violence or fear of death.

We outline below some reasons why children experience fear and some approaches on how to help your child overcome them.

 

Reasons Children Experience Fear:

  • Witnessing a horrific accident.
  • Watching horror movies or being told terrifying tales of monsters and ghosts.
  • Parents’ separation.
  • A violent approach in child rearing, with constant threats.
  • Familial issues and marital problems.
  • Witnessing the parents reacting in a fearful way towards something.

 

How to Approach Fear in Children:

  • Never fight in front of your child.
  • Avoid punishing your child with things that he fears.
  • Avoid threatening your child with things that will scare him.
  • Always reinforce your child’s ego by using empowering phrases that will make him feel strong and fearless.
  • Teach him religious values that will empower him, such as the notion of God being there to protect him always.
  • Prevent him from watching horror movies.
  • Teach your child how to defend himself without the need to rely on an older person.
  • Engage your child in sports and activities that will increase his strength of character.
  • Approach your child with love and affection, as this will increase his sense of security.
  • Always have an open dialogue with your child and allow him to express what he fears.
  • If it becomes necessary, consult with a therapist if your child’s fears become crippling and start affecting his daily routine.

 

References:

www.childanxiety.net

www.kidshealth.org

www.healthychildren.org